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How to Craft Your Company's Vision [Podcast]

Episode 55: In this episode, Michael and Kathryn discuss the key components needed to craft your company's Vision. If you've heard the terms core ideology, BHAG, or Mission Statement kicked around, but have never had a clear grasp of their meaning, then this episode is for you!

Rocket Goals

In This Episode You Will...

  • Discover the 4 components needed to craft a clear vision and their definitions (core values, core purpose, BHAG, and BHAG description).

  • Get examples of core values and learn why you should limit yourself to 3 to 5.

  • Find out why your core purpose should be immeasurable.

  • Learn how a clear vision helps you hire, fire, and motivate employees better.

  • Discover what Vision has to do with Legacy.

 

"The clearer you can articulate the desired end goal, the better chance you have of getting there."

– Michael Redman

Take the Leadership Blindspot Quiz  

References:

Good to Great (by Jim Collins)

HaBO Village

 

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Michael:         Hello everyone, and welcome to HaBO Village. I'm Michael Redman.


Kathryn:
      And I'm Kathryn Redman.


Michael:
      And we're excited you're here today. Today we're going to talk about vision. Have you ever wondered what a vision statement is, how it applies? You probably have heard some depth punishing if you've been in business at all for any length of time. But if you're like us for a very long time, it was super fuzzy. What's a vision statement? What's a mission statement? What's a motto? Or a moto? However, you pronounce that word.


Michael:
      Some people are really confident at what they, like, oh, it's clearer. I didn't know this is the definition because that's the only definition they ever heard or the definition they like most. And I guess at some level, we're the same. But over the years, I've spent a lot of time looking at thinking of it and we have a process that is an evolving process to some extent, but we have some pretty solid parameters. And we talk about five characteristics that are part of a vision.


Michael:
      And for a long time we talked about four and I've been adding a fifth lately because I think it achieves a more effective use of the goal and it helps tighten up some things and we're going to talk about that. And so the things that we consider pretty straightforward in our consulting firm and how we work with clients and how we work with business leaders.


Michael:
      And then let's go from there. And the biggest thing that you really want to take away right off the bat is we've talked about fuzzy terms, right?


Kathryn:
      Lots and lots of fuzzy terms.


Michael:
      Fuzzy terms. Fuzzy terms are those words that everybody goes, "Yeah, I've heard that and I have some kind of definition in my head," and everybody thinks that they're talking about basically the same thing, roughly. But then you make decisions, you do stuff, people go in different directions and all of a sudden you end up with totally different end products. People collide and you realize, why didn't you do a mission statement? "Why didn't you do a vision statement?" "Well, I did." "No, you didn't." "Yes, I did." Well, because nobody sat down and said, let's define it. And fuzzy terms are great words that often need to be defined and clarified. What do we mean in this group, in our community? How are we going to define it? Because how you define something isn't as important is are you achieving the objective that you're trying to?


Kathryn:
      Does everybody understand what you're defining and heading in the same direction? When all is said in done.


Michael:
      Yeah, absolutely, so what we want to do is what's the reason? Let's start out with what's the reason for a vision statement. Kathryn, you and I do a lot of work with clients and we help them through this stuff. What's the point of doing that work? Forget about the parts right now. What are we trying to achieve?


Kathryn:
      So, creating a vision.


Michael:
      Yeah.


Kathryn:
      Which is made up of multiple parts. It's not really a vision statement.


Michael:
      Right. That's one of the ways we define it. We don't have a vision.


Kathryn:
      Yeah. No, we don't talk about a vision statement. We need to be able to articulate what the vision is of your company because it's what keeps you rallied and moving forward when you hit weird walls. Like, what is it that you do and why? Why are you doing this? What are you hoping ultimately to achieve? So when we're talking about vision, we're really talking about that catalytic thing that is the motivator of why you do what you do.


Michael:
      Yeah, no, I think that's good. And for all of you, when we say we don't do a vision statement, a lot of companies have said, you know, what's your vision statement or your mission. And I'd say, okay, "What's the difference and how do you define them?"


Michael:
      And trying to put stuff in a vision statement, it's just hard because really a good vision that motivates people, tells them where to go, how to get there in us in a bigger picture and provides that motivation, that inertia, that encouragement. It can't be said in a statement. Then, it becomes cumbersome. So the way we do it, we actually took this model from Jim Collins, writer of Good to Great. He and another guy wrote a fantastic article from Harvard Business Review Back in '95-ish. It was the mid-'90s.


Kathryn:
      Might even have been '91.


Michael:
      Might have been '91. Mid to early '90s. And it's a phenomenal article, and we stumbled across it a few years ago and I went, this is it. This really, it's made the test of time. It's proven that the dotcom did not obliterate all a good sense when it came to marketing and business because really, I don't know, those of you that are old enough, remember that that's what happened. So let's talk about it. What are the four original parts that we talk about that Collins talks about? That are part of a vision?


Kathryn:
      So one half of it is your core ideology, which is made up of your core purpose and your core values. And then the other half is your envisioned future, which is made up of your big, hairy, audacious goal, BHAG. And a vivid description of that big hairy audacious goal.


Michael:
      We've done this several times for several clients, and we've kind of played with it a little different order at times, but it's really become more and more clear that when you start working with that first part, and you do core values and core purpose, the core values, you need to work on the core values first. It really is the best place to start. And we say to folks, you can't have more than three to five core values, and a core value is ... We're very clear on what that means, right?


Kathryn:
      Yeah. Because I don't know of very many people who have only three or four values that a core value is what we would say is if you were told that you're not allowed to do this thing that you value in your company, you would rather close the doors than move forward.


Kathryn:
      So example, if one of your core values was honesty and for some reason in your market being honest was no longer an option for you to survive, then you would walk away from your company rather than moving forward. That's a core value. It's that thing that is so deep that you won't violate it. It goes against every fiber of your being at a personal level to violate a core value. Companies have those kinds of core values.


Michael:
      Or they should.


Kathryn:
      Or they should. In order to really create a clear picture of who you are and why you exist, discovering and really being able to articulate those core values is really important.


Michael:
      What do you think the biggest challenge we've seen with leaders is in picking and settling into what those core values are?


Kathryn:
      I think it always feels like they're going to leave something out or they feel like they have to be somehow unique. Core values, you could have the same core values as 25 other companies, but they're still yours. And even with language, one of the things we do when we're working with core values is we say, "I have a core value of X. And what I mean by that is," so we actually put definition around the word so that it doesn't remain kind of a fuzzy term. So, "We believe in authenticity, and what we mean by that is," it's that kind of a way of approaching it.


Michael:
      Yeah, we value authenticity. Okay. So we have three to five words that are in these core values. They are there to describe something that's really important to us. So, Half a Bubble Out has trust. And then we always define trust as competency and character. Sometimes we pull those out. Sometimes we just leave them there. But we say we value trust and we value authenticity. We value fun.


Kathryn:
      We value kindness.


Michael:
      We value kindness. And then we really value learning and growing. Those are huge pieces of parts to us. So you'll see sometimes those core values of ours that really go, this is the riverbank for us as a company. This is the way that we say that we allow these things.


Michael:
      Now here's the other part of that aspect of core values. We talk about and have been taught and learned and teach other folks that you hire to your core values, you train to your core values and you train and you train and you train and you fire to them. You don't just think once and close the door, you actually go, I want you out there, if you're thinking right now what our core values, most people, if we say, do you have core values? They go, of course I do because we all have values.


Michael:
      And if we're of any substance at all, and we're not wishy washy in life, we have strong opinions and things that are important to us. That might be our faith. It might be our family. Who knows what it is. My experience is that when we talk to these folks and we asked them to articulate it, we've never sat down and had them rattle off, "These are my core values." I've never seen any leader that we've worked with that's come in wanting help with marketing and messaging or any kind of consulting at all to be able to say, oh, here's our three values, here's our four values, here's our five core values.


Kathryn:
      Well, especially when there's more than one. And almost always you're working with more than one human with leading a company, right? So then you've got a room full of people who are like, especially if they've never done the exercises before and they've never tried to ferret it out, you have to kind of get everything out on the board. And this is important to me. And then other people are like, I hate that word because that word happens to bring out something really negative for them, and they don't like it. You know, "We value accountability." "I hate that word." It's really interesting to watch people wrestle through and in our experience we always succeed in getting people down to where they need to be, but it is some hard work.


Michael:
      Yeah, and it's not something that you just sit down and write down on a piece of paper. Matter of fact, we intentionally make people at least take two, sometimes three sessions just to nail down their core values. Sometimes we leave the core value conversation, go do some other work and then come back because it requires you to settle in and invariably people shift and change a little bit. Not a lot. But you're thinking, here's intelligent people who are running a company that is profitable and successful, but so much opportunity is being left on the table when they haven't defined it, written it down and articulated it regularly to people: what are your core values?


Michael:
      So, that's important. We're going to hire, train and fire to your core values. Once those core values are figured out and you go this is really the riverbank for the behavior that's going to be allowed in our organization, then you start looking for your core purpose. How do you articulate your core purpose?


Michael:
      And your core purpose is not a value statement. It's not a value proposition for your company. Your core purpose is something that your company does. It's kind of at the core of who you are. It can be said in one to two sentences max, and it's something that is never going to be finished. That's one of the difference. We'll talk about missions, but a lot of missions I'm like, did you make this up? Did you do this? Yes. But a purpose statement, your core purpose statement, for instance, Disney has at one point, and I don't know, it's not easy to find if it's still published or not, but at one point, their core purpose for Disney was to make people happy. To deliver happiness, especially at the parks.


Michael:
      Okay, well, a core purpose. Make people happy. Is it ever finished? No. Can you ever measure when it's finished? No. But is there a threshold in which somebody is happy? Yes. There's multiple descriptions and they can talk about that and that's this core thing. You come here to Disneyland, you want to be happy, and our job is to make you happy in a wholesome environment. Wholesome is one of their core purposes or their core values, especially at the parks.


Kathryn:
      Yes, their core values.


Michael:
      Not core purpose. Core values. So you have this scenario where that's their thing and some other companies might be just to imagine innovative solutions. I think that was 3M or something close to that. And so you have these things, it's like it allows you to embody this core thing without it having to be all measurable.


Kathryn:
      I mean, I guess it's kind of a tagline, but I think it's a purpose. When Apple did think differently, or think different, how would you articulate where that fits in the puzzle of things?


Michael:
      Yeah, that's a really good question.


Kathryn:
      Those are hard ones.


Michael:
      I wouldn't call it a core purpose. I wouldn't say that their core purpose came along 10, 15 years into business.


Kathryn:
      No. That's true.


Michael:
      It was an amazing ad campaign.


Kathryn:
      It's more like a motto. A tagline.


Michael:
      It's an amazing ad campaign. It's an amazing branding opportunity.


Kathryn:
      It was born out of their values of innovation and creativity.


Michael:
      And solving problems. They wanted to solve many of the computer challenges from a totally different perspective, create new ways, innovate new ideas, and they continue to innovate as a company. And innovation, I would say, has to be one of their core values because they're always tweaking and changing everything and making it better and they don't want to stay the same.


Michael:
      They just screwed up my laptop recently because they took away all my USB ports because they think they're innovating my laptop. Not that I'm bitter.


Kathryn:
      No, never.


Michael:
      Is anybody out there frustrated that they, that the new Macs have USBs and if you're a PC lover and you're saying, "Haha, you shouldn't have a Mac, I really don't want to hear from you on this topic." I love you, but I don't want to hear from you. I'm speaking to my Mac peeps out there. Now that that's out of my system.


Michael:
      We've got core purpose, core values, core purpose. Now what? How is this helpful? Here's one of the things that happens a lot and this is a really practical, relevant reason for this. One, in your core values, and you can have more values as an organization; we have actually 25 or 30 posted in our conference room. But we have our core ones that are significant. And what happens is people learn that this is the way we behave in this organization. This is the thing that's important here. If you want to stay here, we hire people, and go do you agree with our values? If you disagree with our values, this is not a good place for you to work.


Michael:
      If you really aren't into innovation and you're into making things stay the same for 50 years, don't go work at Macintosh or at Apple. Don't go try and build Macs or anything like that. But this gives a behavior and says, okay, this is how we do things.


Michael:
      Now, here's what's awesome about these first two parts and we'll refine it. When you start developing your team and your leaders and everybody else, you can actually start to give people more responsibility to make decisions.


Michael:
      Because one of the reasons that leaders are nervous about letting people and their employees make decisions is because they're afraid that they're going to do something that doesn't reflect well on them. And when you say these are our core values, you can then start to say, well, that behavior, you've got to make all these decisions and you stayed within the core values. Well done. Even if you fail, you make a mistake. You didn't violate the core principles. Did you stay within the core purpose and the core values? Well then, well done. You were trying to do something and you made a mistake. Let's correct that. Let's make some adjustments and let's coach you along. As opposed to, you know, authenticity and trust are huge for us. If you deceive or lie to a customer in the idea of trying to make us a more successful company, then-


Kathryn:
      It will have been nice knowing you


Michael:
      Then we can let you go. But it gives more parameters so that our employees, our staff actually know what safe. It's so much easier now because they know the core purpose and they know the core values.


Kathryn:
      So would you say Michael.


Michael:
      Yes, Kathryn?


Kathryn:
      That one of the things that are core purpose should do is when you read it if it's yours, if it's for your company, when you read the core purposes, there should be a sense of yes. That is what I'm here for.


Michael:
      I think so. I think the closer you get to the yes, the more powerful it is. And if you are in an organization where the founder doesn't exist anymore and ownership isn't in a sole proprietor type of set up or the senior leader isn't the owner and they have the last say, then you start to move into a community. Now, there are companies where it's owner-led and they still love community and collaboration and all that kind of stuff. That's fine.


Michael:
      But what you want to do is you want to move into that place where if you're the senior leader, you're going, what really reflects me because I own this company, so I wanted to make sure it, reflects our team. Our team has buy-in, but I've got to make sure that I'm okay with this because things change in life and if they don't own your company, they may come and go. They might be there 20 years, but then they leave. So you want their input, but you have to make a decision and be bold about your decision. If it's not owner led, then you've got a leadership team usually and I recommend that they actually sit down and go through these exercises and have somebody from the outside do it, but get to a place where, and this can happen. The room is happy with yes, but you usually have to do some teaching and coaching on what is this core purpose, what do they look like, what's the different variations, what's the power and the importance so that everybody's on board.


Michael:
      Because I've seen it where one person, sometimes two people, they don't understand, they haven't been framed enough yet, taught enough so that when you go into talking about it, a conflict is there and they don't all resonate mainly because they just don't understand the point and they have a different definition in their head and they haven't gotten to the place where they're comfortable with saying, "Okay, I see what you're doing. And you're saying we're going to define it this way and I'm on board. I'm going to have a good attitude and I'm going to play because I see that."


Michael:
      Once everybody believes in the importance of understanding what it is and they agree on that and the importance of it, then I think as a community, a small leadership team, you can get to the point where you corporately go, yes.


Michael:
      And when you do that and you start telling your team, it's not just a thing that is some cognitive exercise. It actually touches a part of us as people that go, my core desire as a human being and I believe every human being is, I want my life to have some form of purpose and mission. And if I can have my job, and my job that I work at 40 to 50 hours a week actually allows me to contribute towards a purpose and mission and a greater purpose and mission, and I know what that is, my work has more meaning and were more engaged. And that's just been proven through research, let alone it's fairly intuitive for a lot of people.


Michael:
      So I think the core purpose starts to let you have that because all of a sudden your staff can go, "Wow, you believe in it?" I just think it's really hard to inspire people when you're not inspired yourself. Would you agree?


Kathryn:
      I would agree. Okay. So one half of this four pieces. Well, five pieces, sorry. Five. We're going to add a fifth.


Michael:
      Because I'm in the process of adding the fifth.


Kathryn:
      But from the Collins perspective, that Jim Collins article, the, so the first two parts are the first two pieces is the core ideology, which is core purpose, core values. The second part of it is then envisioned future. So, let's talk a little bit about that. So, BHAG and vivid description. So, we would describe your big hairy audacious goal as when you look out on the horizon.


Michael:
      Big horizon.


Kathryn:
      10, 15-


Michael:
      20 years.


Kathryn:
      25 years.


Michael:
      We talked about 10, but I think 10's too early.


Kathryn:
      Yeah. So, okay. Way out there. Although, you start talking 25 if you know, if my audience is 50 then that's going to start getting scary.


Michael:
      Yeah, absolutely.


Kathryn:
      But if you're thinking way out there, what is it that if everything went the way you wanted, what is it that you're dreaming about? What is the big, big goal that you have? So, for example, here at Half a Bubble Out, one of our BHAGs is to impact 10,000 companies with the message of passionate provision. Help 10,000 companies become passionate provision companies.


Michael:
      Or greater passionate provision companies.


Kathryn:
      That's a big hairy audacious goal.


Michael:
      That's huge. 10,000. I mean, there's like 12 or 14 of us on our team and that's a lot of people to impact.


Kathryn:
      It's a lot of people to impact.


Michael:
      One of the things about a BHAG that I think is really important is you don't know if you could actually accomplish it.


Kathryn:
      Yeah. It's got to be a little bit bigger than you, like it's got to be something that you look at and just go, like that's going to require several miracles and a whole lot of friends.


Michael:
      Yeah. You probably can't do it alone. I think a good BHAG is, especially the way we are assuming beings and I think community and teamwork is so important that you shouldn't be able to accomplish that BHAG on your own. You're not dreaming big enough in my opinion, if you can do it all on your own.


Michael:
      And that's even hiring people, either hiring employees or hiring subcontractors, hiring vendors, companies, lawyers, you need people around you. And that BHAG is that thing on the north. It's usually described within a few sentences to a paragraph or two. Maybe a couple of paragraphs. But it's, where are you going? What are you trying to do?


Michael:
      I mean, we shared our BHAG with you, but the other half of that envision future is the detailed description. Right?


Kathryn:
      Right.


Michael:
      And as we do this, the more we do this, I think the more we're actually learning even more the power of this and how to massage it, nuance it as we go from working with ourselves and client to client to client, it's powerful out of the box, but what we've realized is the more you start to really nuance and envision ... I mean, if any of you have been in leadership long enough or if you've done any leadership training or anything, the whole idea of the clearer you can articulate the end desired goal, the better chance you have of getting there, right? The better chance you have of ending up in that or close to that. But if you don't describe where you're supposed to end, then you'll never know if you got there or not and you'll end up ... who knows where you'll end up? It's a common thing we all talk about it as leaders.


Kathryn:
      Yeah. So for us, you do vivid description, you say, okay, if we can impact 10,000 companies with the message of passion and provision and help them become passion provision companies, if those companies have an average of 25 employees, then suddenly we have 250 million people who have passion and provision jobs. That begins to change the dynamic of their communities. It changes their families. I mean, the impact.


Kathryn:
      So you start getting into the detailed description of the kind of impact it would have. Like, what would happen if you reached your BHAG? What would it look like? How would it change the world? Yeah. And that's the vivid description piece and then you start to go, "Oh, that's very cool. I can, I can rally some time behind that."


Michael:
      Well, and this idea that if you changed 10,000 companies, if you could change 10,000 leader, you'll change their companies. And if you can change 10,000 companies, you're going to change the people in those companies. And if you can change 10,000 companies' employees at whatever that number was that you just gave me.


Kathryn:
      250 million, 25 employees per company,


Michael:
      I usually think of it as 10 employees.


Kathryn:
      Even then.


Michael:
      But imagine what that does. You know, let's say 50% of those people are married and let's say 50% or 75% of those people have kids and all of a sudden you start to teach and train this concept of this core value that work can have value and meaning and purpose and that the 40 to 50 hours a week you spend at work is not just so you can get to the weekend and pay the bills, but it actually allows you to take care of all your monetary needs and physical needs in life from provision. But it also meets the soul needs that we have and feeds ourselves and feeds that need of, "I want to use my gifts, talents, and skills. I want to be somebody who's growing and I want to have somebody that I feel like I made a significant difference because I brought what I am uniquely good at and capable at and I brought that and it was used in a greater purpose."


Michael:
      And, then you get paid and you say, "Well, that's what work is." And I think that's ideally what work is as we talk about passion and provision. You and I both have a camaraderie with other leaders, of companies and entrepreneurs and how hard it is and the challenges in it. And being that kind of leader is a unique breed of people because we suffer from unique circumstances that nobody else suffers from and we're challenged by things and we sacrifice in ways that nobody else has to sacrifice. But I care as much about helping them change so that they can be better leaders because I care about leaders leading people.


Kathryn:
      Yup.


Michael:
      And you and I talk about that all the time, but we don't always get to speak about it.


Michael:
      Okay, so the last four or five minutes we're talking about putting, we're giving you a vivid description, a vivid example of what do you do when you start talking about the description, the vivid description ... you're putting meat and flesh and all this on the bones of the distant future. What does that look like?


Michael:
      And then what you do is you step away and when you have that kind of vision that has those four things, you have this thing that you can use. And the reason I wanted to add a fifth is just because I think it's practical that you start thinking about the mission statement in there, kind of bolting it on.


Michael:
      It's really not part of it, but it's bolted on. It's like four plus one because you've talked about where we're going and vision future. You've talked about our core ideology and our core purpose and our core values and then you bring that on regularly to, "And what we do today is this to accomplish that."


Michael:
      And maybe you're achieving X, Y, Z and heading towards that envisioned future and following your behavior patterns and core values or core purpose, but you know, today the market lets us do X. Tomorrow, the market might change and do Y. It used to be when we first started this company, we did a lot of television and radio and to say we were an advertising agency that did television and radio.


Michael:
      And now we are a company that does probably 80% of our work is digital, digital ads, websites, digital marketing, public relations, business consulting. Some people would say that if they thought all we were was a radio and TV advertising agency, then they'd say that company's gone. We failed. We didn't make it. But what we did is we had larger goals of passion/provision and we had desires to have employees and everything else and we pivoted with the market.


Kathryn:
      Yeah, and our goal at Half a Bubble Out was to help our customers grow their companies through marketing and advertising. And so whatever means that has to take on because what we're doing today probably isn't what we're going to be doing in 10 years. Right? That's going to shift and change and keep shifting and changing.


Michael:
      Well, and these 16 years have let us move into training and education and leadership development because of all that we've seen and now we have something to speak to from our experience and all the extra training over the years. And it allows us to move into what we're calling HaBO village.


Michael:
      So those are powerful, but you want to bolt on what is it you are doing today? And I think that a mission statement is a simplified way of saying this is what we do.


Michael:
      I'm not convinced at this point folks, that a mission statement and a value statement for your company are much different. I think too many things try to go into a mission statement. It's too vague. There's never been really clear, agreed upon things that go into it, especially in the last 30 years. But if we were to say and agree that we're going to define a mission statement as what we do, so the vision's where we're going and this bolt on is, "And what we do today to accomplish those things is X, Y, and Z."


Kathryn:
      So in that case, your mission over the course of time can be adjusted and tweaked and changed. But your vision isn't what's changing.


Michael:
      Absolutely. And you'll see that I think in several books and several authors, lots of people who've thought about this, the mission statement is more flexible. The vision is less flexible because it may take 25 or 30 years to see that envisioned future and your envisioned ideology that the-


Kathryn:
      Core ideology.


Michael:
      Core ideology, with the values and purpose, that doesn't change.


Kathryn:
      Yeah, because it's the why.


Michael:
      It's the heartbeat.


Kathryn:
      It's the heartbeat of why you do what you do. Yeah. And so the market may shift and change and we can shift, so that may shift our mission statement.


Michael:
      Every once in a while we'll talk about Guinness. Mr. Guinness, who started Guinness Beer. By the way, the company started in the 1400s, I think it was.


Kathryn:
      No.


Michael:
      It wasn't.


Kathryn:
      The 1800s.


Michael:
      No, I think it's longer than that. She's going to look it up.


Kathryn:
      I'm going to look it up.


Michael:
      But what is interesting is, I periodically go back and just read about them and do some research and stuff like that. And they've been through a lot of changes in 2017, 2018 corporately. It turns out the family still owns 51% of Guinness. 51% is still owned by the family. None of them are on the board of directors. But that's a centuries old company. At least a century and a half.


Kathryn:
      1725.


Michael:
      1725.


Kathryn:
      Arthur Guinness.


Michael:
      If you do any studying on him, his core values and his core purpose on how he was going to ... he brewed beer and he was going to make sure that he took care of people and he demonstrated some core values and core purpose in the midst of everything, the way he took care of his employees over the years. Pretty amazing. We've talked about it before. We won't go into detail now, maybe talk about it again later.


Michael:
      But one of the things that happened I think it was the first 40-ish years of this company, they brewed a specific kind of beer that was not the type of beer they brew now and he changed everything. He anticipated that there was going to be a whole 'nother shift and he changed the entire brewery to brew a totally different type of beer that wasn't popular or common yet and he had a feeling that it was going to take off and he stopped brewing the old kind of beer that had built a 40 year business. If your business had been around for 40 years, would you have gotten rid of it?


Michael:
      Would you have totally trashed it and said, "We're going to do something different?: It doesn't change the core purpose. It doesn't change the core values, but your mission there. Your mission's changing things. And Mr. Guinness was amazing at helping fight poverty, in so many different ways.


Michael:
      So that's just, to kind of cap off today's episode, just really a core story about what does it mean to have core purpose and core values and is it something that you could pass on? In today's world, in America, we don't think about when everybody is thinking about selling their company and making their money and everything else. We don't talk about generations and legacy as in the context of your core purpose and core values. Can they last beyond you as a leader? Can they last 30 years beyond your leadership? Could they last a generation or two beyond your leadership?


Michael:
      I think even if you're not going to sell your company that long, even if you're not going to have it that long, or you're not going to give it to your kids, the idea of creating a purpose and core vision and everything that could and a vision of what could be the future, the possibility of something amazing in the future that inspires you and benefits others in the service of, I think humanity, no matter whether you're serving beer, because I think that's in service of humanity or something more, a little bit more magnanimous.


Kathryn:
      Beer is evidence that God loves us.


Michael:
      Ben Franklin.


Kathryn:
      That's Ben Franklin. I knew it was somebody like that.


Michael:
      And everybody else who loves beer, who's quoted it since then. See, if you can do something that's that inspiring to you. I want to inspire you to think hard and come up with something because this is powerful.


Michael:
      We had got some question this last week about this whole idea of vision and I wanted to unfold this, but I think we need to do another episode on how do you use these things? How do you use this stuff in your daily-


Kathryn:
      Yeah. What parts do you use to motivate employees? What part is just stuff that you're doing between the leadership?


Michael:
      How much should it be internally versus externally to customers? How do you use this stuff to kind of inspire the company and and where do you leverage it, I think is just some really practical, tactical things would be important in another episode. So, I think we should do that. Maybe in the next episode. Maybe a couple of episodes down.


Kathryn:
      By the way, for those of you that are still feeling squirrelly, because I can't do math, just know that I know that I can't do math, so it really isn't. 250 million is just 250,000. I saw extra zeros on the calculator and I got all excited.


Michael:
      Really?


Kathryn:
      Yeah.


Michael:
      All right.


Kathryn:
      I blame the calculator style.


Michael:
      This is my partner, my wife.


Kathryn:
      I do the books, but I can't do math. So, don't anybody worry. I can't leave that unsaid because-


Michael:
      250,000.


Kathryn:
      It's embarrassing.


Michael:
      There was probably five people that were sitting there going, "She's wrong."


Kathryn:
      Super annoyed.


Michael:
      Sitting there, annoyed.


Kathryn:
      People who can do math in their heads. Like, "She's an idiot."


Michael:
      Like, they pulled over to the side of the road and started yelling out there. There was a rage.


Kathryn:
      God. I've caused an accident somewhere.


Michael:
      There was a rage.


Kathryn:
      I'm sorry.


Michael:
      All right. She's apologizing. You can breath deeply now. All right, folks. That's it today on vision. I want to inspire you and encourage you to go out and if you haven't done this, do it. If you have done it, I want you to take a look at it if you haven't looked at it in a while and tune it back up and make sure that you're communicating it regularly to your team, your leadership team and your staff.


Michael:
      Because if it's the real deal and you believe in it and they believe you believe in it, they'll believe in it too and it can really gel your entire company, both from a productivity perspective and a culture perspective. It's pretty amazing.


Michael:
      So, I think that's it for today. I'm Michael Redman.


Kathryn:
      And I'm Kathryn Redman.


Michael:
      And if you would like to know anything else about HaBO Village, any other episodes, or would like more training, we would recommend that you go to habovillage.com, get on the wait list for the news training course that we're going to be releasing. It's going to be pretty stinkin' awesome. We're putting a lot of energy and polish on it. We're pretty excited that we're going to be able to impact more people beyond what we're doing on the podcast.


Kathryn:
      And it's trying to get to that 10,000 number.


Michael:
      So thank you very much, you all have a great week. Bye bye.